Lawn Care Tips For Spring

Neglecting your lawn now can mean paying for it later. Whether you want your lawn to look good because you’re selling your home or you just want to keep your home beautiful, taking the time to protect your lawn in the spring is key. Spring is the beginning of new grass life which means that nurturing your yard starts now. Here are some tips about how you can start to cultivate the type of lawn that you can be proud of and that your neighbors will be jealous of.

 Attack Thatch (Aka Rake) – Thatch are those nasty clumps of dead grass that essentially suffocate any new baby grass trying to survive in this world. So, once the snow is gone (which it likely is now… fingers crossed for no more snow!).. dig out your rake and get that dead grass out of there! Make sure to rake deeply especially if you didn’t take the time and do so in the fall.

 

Lime is Prime - Grass is no fan of acid (which could be indicated if you have compaction or moss) so make sure to create a neutral pH for your little ones by liming your lawn. Make sure to send in a sample of your soil to ensure that it does indeed need liming because liming is only corrective, not preventative.

 

Whack those Weeds-  Getting rid of weeds before the flower and seed is key. It may not be fun, but getting outside in the spring and scouring your lawn for those pesky dandelions will help your lawn to be even more beautiful (and less yellow) when the summer months roll around. While spraying weeds with herbicides may be more effective in the fall, in the spring doing outsides and pulling them will garner you better results.

 

If your interested in learning about more spring lawn care tips a great place to start is the About.com site (here) or to go into a local home renovations or gardening store and talk to one of their experts. 





April 20th, 2012   Posted under Home Repair and Maintenance Tips, Seasonal |

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